Economic Dream Team Machine

Want to play president of the United States and build a team of experts to revive an economy suffering the after-effects of Covid-19? Breakingviews has evaluated potential candidates for key economic positions in a Joe Biden or Donald Trump White House and graded them in six categories based on their prior experience or academic achievement. For the 2020 race, and in keeping with the zeitgeist of American capitalism, we added a new category, ESG, for environmental, social and governance.
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How it works

· Hover over prospective candidates to see their backgrounds and ratings
· Drag and drop your favorites from either side into various roles
· As you make selections, total points for each candidate are tallied based on the adviser ratings
· Scores range from as low as zero to as high as five depending on prior experience
· When all jobs are filled, the final head-to-head scores will appear
· Share your scores on social media
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Democrats

Presidential Nominee

Joe Biden Joe Biden
Donald Trump Donald Trump

Treasury Secretary

 
Treasury Secretary

This cabinet-level position, currently occupied by Steven Mnuchin, directs every aspect of the U.S. Treasury. He or she helps the president to maintain a strong economy by promoting conditions that facilitate economic growth, overseeing financial stability, monitoring national financial security and managing the government’s accounts. A broad-based skill set is required, including extensive understanding of markets, budgeting and international affairs. The Treasury secretary must also advise on policies related to tax, housing, financial regulation and government debt. The secretary also chairs the Financial Stability Oversight Council.

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National Economic
Council Director

 
National Economic Council Director

The National Economic Council director acts as the president’s closest economic policy advisor. In that capacity, the president may shape the NEC in any way desired. For example, if the president is particularly concerned about unemployment, he or she might bring in a director with expertise geared specifically towards job creation. Traditionally, NEC directors have played a significant role in budget discussions though the current chief, Larry Kudlow, has focused on shaping the administration’s economic message.

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Federal Reserve Chair

 
Federal Reserve Chair

The chair of the central bank wears a number of hats. The most important is to direct U.S. monetary policy, as he or she resides over the Federal Open Market Committee. The FOMC decides how to best carry out the Fed’s dual mandate to pursue full employment and price stability. The chair, currently Jerome Powell, also oversees other Fed matters, such as financial stability and bank regulation.

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Secretary of Commerce

 
Secretary of Commerce

The Commerce Department acts as the ambassador for U.S. businesses both at home and abroad. The secretary, currently Wilbur Ross, promotes trade, foreign investment and innovation, and is a member of the president’s cabinet. Various offices that collect and provide data are also within the agency, such as the Census Bureau, the Bureau of Economic Analysis and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which gathers information on the environment. One key area overseen by the department is licensing and regulating export controls to ensure national security objectives are met.

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Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers

 
Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers

The chair is in charge of a group of three-member panel that gives the president economic advice on both domestic and international policy. The council is part of the executive office of the president. and conducts economic research. The chair, currently acting head Tyler Goodspeed, is often an influential voice and people who have occupied that spot often go on to bigger jobs, such as Federal Reserve Chair for Ben Bernanke and Janet Yellen.

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U.S. Trade Representative

 
U.S. Trade Representative

The person in this role develops and coordinates U.S. policy on international trade, commodity agreements and direct investment policy. The position can be influential at times when trade issues are at the forefront, such as under the Trump administration. The current representative, Robert Lighthizer, has led talks on the so-called Phase One deal with China and other pacts. Under Trump, the USTR’s office has become a critic of free trade agreements.

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Wildcard

 
Wildcard

Some possible other important economic posts could include director of the Office of Management and Budget. The position helps to craft the president’s annual budget and would play a major role in any debt deal discussions, including formulation of policy and its implementation in Congress. Other economic appointments could include the president’s chief of staff or a special economic advisor, such as a “Budget Czar,” to lead a specific initiative.

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Republicans